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Word Order

Ido’s usual word order is more or less as in English — the person or thing performing the action (the subject) comes first, then the action itself (the verb), followed by the person or thing acted on (the object).

Iesus konstruktis mea « hot rod ». Jesus built my hot rod.
Me sorcis vu. I put a spell on you.
Me absolute cesus ludar World of Warcraft kelkahore por vu. I would totally stop playing World of Warcraft for a few hours for you.

The object can also be placed before the verb, but must still come after the subject:

Iesus mea « hot rod » konstruktis. Jesus built my hot rod.
Me vu sorcis. I put a spell on you.

Unlike in English, adjectives* as well as adverbs can come before or after the nouns they describe:

Me amas mea geya filiulo mortinta! I love my dead, gay son!
To rapide intenseskis. That escalated quickly.
*The placement of adjectives in formal writing, on the other hand, is more complicated.

Adjectives used as part of a compound verb must come after esar, but can be separated by an adverb:

Iesus esas fine konstruktinta mea « hot rod ». Jesus has finally built my hot rod.
Me esus absolute cesinta ludar World of Warcraft kelkahore por vu. I would totally have stopped playing World of Warcraft for a few hours for you.

However, if one wants to emphasize part of a sentence, one can put that part first (marking it with the accusative -n), or, if the thing to be emphasized is the subject, introduce it with esar:

Esis Iesus, qua konstruktis mea « hot rod ». It was Jesus who built my hot rod.
Vun me sorcis. On you I put a spell.

One can sometimes change the word order to simulate that of a translated original:

Tota Gallia en tri parti dividita esas. Omnia Gallia in tres partes divisa est.
Kulfutuos me vun e bokofutuos! Pedicabo ego vos et irrumabo!